Sunday 27 May 2018
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La Motte Museum exhibition pays tribute to Pierneef

Pierneef Bushveld trees (1955), La Motte Museum collection, displayed on JH Pierneef studio easel with a bronze bust of Pierneef by Coert Steynberg, DITSONG collection

A new exhibition at the La Motte Museum pays tribute to the life and work of SA artist Jacob Hendrik Pierneef. Fittingly titled A Tribute to the life and work of Jacob Hendrik Pierneef (1886-1957) the exhibition will run for the duration of 2017. The exhibition celebrates the artist’s contribution to South African art and enhances La Motte’s permanent heritage collection with selected artworks and personal artefacts from various South African collections.

Sensei Chris Ensil – a sport legend

Sensei Chris Ensil with Western Cape Minister of Cultural Affairs and Sport, Anroux Marais.

Franschhoek’s resident karate instructor has been recognised as a ‘legend’ by the Department of Culture and Sport at the Western Cape Legend Awards Ceremony on 14 December 2016. 

Mettler new Municipal Manager

Geraldine Mettler is Stellenbosch Municipality's new Municipal Manager.

Geraldine Mettler has been appointed as the new municipal manager of Stellenbosch Municipality. She started in the role at the beginning of January.

Franschhoek fires fewer than last year

Volunteers man the fire line at one of the La Motte fires.

Responding to a request for information from the Tatler, Ashley Bauer – manager of the Franschhoek Ward of the Winelands Fire Protection Association (WFPA) – said that there have been 35 fires in the Franschhoek ward since the beginning of the fire season (Nov 2016 – Jan 2017).  “Two of the fires resulted from contractors doing hot work, i.e. grinding and welding. The rest have been unlawful ignitions, deliberately lighted fires and fireworks over the New Year,” he said. 

Bursary boost

The Fremco Trust received a welcome fund injection on 16 November. Present at the handover were (FLTR): Louis Cloete (Trustee: Fremco Trust), Wendell Jephtah (Trustee: Fremco Trust), John Hesom (Director: Frandevco), Bruce Berry (Chairman: Frandevco), Herman van der Merwe (Director: Frandevco), Ralph Damonse (Fremco Administrator), Dirk Hattingh (CEO: Frandevco), Dawie De Villiers (Trustee: Fremco Trust), Norval Williams (Chairman: Fremco Trust), Marion Adams (Trustee: Fremco Trust) and Ruth Morgan (Trustee: Fremco Trust).

The Franschhoek Country Club Estate Development Company (Pty) Ltd (Frandevco), developers of the Fransche Hoek Estate, handed over a financial contribution to the Fremco Trust, which represents community-based organizations in Franschhoek.

The development of the Fransche Hoek Estate flowed from a social compact that was signed in 1998 by stake holders, including the then Franschhoek Municipality, as part of the Franschhoek Empowerment and Development Initiative (FEDI). Fremco each year awards bursaries to children from the Franschhoek community and donates a percentage of its income to the Mont Rochelle Nature Reserve.

The project was financed by the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) and implemented by Frandevco. A unique development model was used, which is being used on other projects in South Africa as well.

At the time of its formation the activities of the Fremco Trust were endorsed by President Nelson Mandela.

Explore Boschendal – with Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth

Explore Boschendal by carriage with Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria

Boschendal offers all that you’d expect of a wine estate – restaurants, wine tasting, picnics – and then some!  Also on offer are half and whole day spa treatments, walking and mountain bike excursions (on 30 km of new trails), fly fishing – and horse riding.  It can be stated quite categorically here that if ever there was an enthusiastic team it is that which now runs the equestrian activities.

The equestrian team is headed by Hans Mbalula and his brother Petrus.  Hans was formerly a barman at Boschendal’s deli/Werf restaurant/picnics), but on hearing Boschendal’s CEO discussing the pros and cons of riding and related activities on the estate he immediately volunteered to give up bartending and to run this new initiative.

It transpired that he had, in fact, been raised on a Free State farm and as a boy had ridden regularly before and after school to carry out a variety of farm duties such as cattle and sheep herding.  He had, too, it was discovered, learned early on how to win the confidence and calm down a wild horse so that within a few days (often in fact within one day) he could saddle and ride it without any of the bronco busting histrionics of the Wild West’s cowboys.  He had also learned how to put horses into harness to pull a cart or a plough, again using a minimum of force and a maximum of coaxing.

Boschendal now has 13 horses, including a few Shetland ponies, the majority of which are massive Shire horses, Friesians, Clydesdales and Percherons, all of them giants of the horsey world – they grow to 16 hands or more.  Being immensely strong, they are capable of carrying a 100 kg or 110 kg rider in armchair comfort.  Surprisingly, however, they are also quite exceptionally gentle so that, despite their size, they can be and sometimes are ridden by quite small children.  A few lucky riders are offered the opportunity to mount these massive horses, but most of Boschendal’s outrides are done with well-trained smaller horses.

Today the Boschendal horses can be hired for outrides and these usually take the visitor into unspoilt conservation fynbos territory where waterbuck and eland have been introduced by Boschendal’s owners.  For those prepared to rise early Boschendal offers a breakfast ride in its extensive conservation territory with delicious eggs, bacon and mushrooms cooked over an open fire.  The rides can last up to three hours and afford the visitor a total escape from the overcrowded mechanised world.

Shire horses are, however, at their most impressive when they are acting as draught animals.  Their huge size make it possible for them easily to pull carts, the weight of which would bring lesser horses, even fully trained hackneys, to their knees.

At Boschendal the management now offers visitors one-hour cart rides almost daily. The carriage can take a small number of adults and a larger number of children.  Passengers sit on a beautifully restored 19th-century landau and this gives them a tranquil lovely way to see the estate and to watch these big horses working so willingly.  The foremost carriage pair are black Friesian mares.  They are sisters and are named Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth.  Their names are appropriate because they exude a patrician, almost regal ambience, as if aware that they are several cuts above today’s typical livery stable animals.

Booking is essential for a carriage ride, but, as Samantha Lundie, wife of the CEO of Boschendal who is closely involved with this operation, has said, “An overnight visit to Boschendal these days is incomplete without a carriage ride – it somehow epitomises all that the estate stands for.”

horses@boschendal.co.za | 021 870 4211

North Indian delight

Marigold cuisine

Marigold, Franschhoek’s first authentic Indian cuisine restaurant, opened its doors on 8 December 2016.  The opening coincided with the launch of Heritage Square, a proud new addition to the Leeu Collection portfolio.

The brand new restaurant offers a feast of exotic flavours that will delight any gourmand. Marigold’s small-plates menu is inspired by the aromatic and spicy North Indian cuisine. Look forward to rich, fragrant curries and flavourful biryanis with succulent meat dishes that are cooked in a charcoal tandoor.

Seasoned chef Vanie Padayachee hails from Durban and was most recently a part of the Le Quartier Français culinary team. She has been integral in the opening of various restaurants as well as a cooking school in South Africa.

“My style of cooking is influenced by the rich diversity of South African culture and I have experience at tempering and blending spices,” says Vanie. “My recent visits to India to experience the culture and cuisine first-hand has broadened my knowledge-base and brings an authenticity and tangible reference of its origins to Marigold’s menu.”

To begin your meal consider a selection of Indian savoury appetisers before enjoying one of the restaurant’s signature main dishes. The layered rice Biryanis offer a delicious and complex level of flavour, while the curries offer something for everyone – delicious vegetarian options, tender chicken and slow-cooked lamb. Enjoy succulent prawns, line fish, chicken or beef kebabs cooked to perfection in the charcoal tandoor. Each dish is accompanied by a variety of traditional Indian bread, rice, salad and raita.

The interior, with its exposed brickwork, timber flooring, bold geometric wallpaper and African inspired fabrics offers banquette-style seating for 60 guests. Slatted dividers offer privacy, yet maintain the feel of a magnificent feast.

The restaurant also has seating outside in the Heritage Sqaure courtyard for a further 20 guests. Leeu Collections’ iconic signature statue of a lion by acclaimed sculptor Jop Kunneke is the focal point of the courtyard. The lion is a reference to Leeu Collection’s founder, Analjit Singh, as “Singh” means lion in Sanskrit (“leeu” in Afrikaans).

Marigold, located on Heritage Square, 9 Huguenot Street, will be open seven days a week for lunch from 12h00 to 15h00 and dinner will be served between 18h00 and 22h00 (although times might change during the quieter season).

Let’s talk about the (Black) Elephant in the room…

Enjoy the food & wine pairing on the Ryan's Kitchen terrace

Born out of synchronicity, fortuitous friendships and a love of wine, Black Elephant Vintners has extended that passion into partnering its wine collection with a crafted menu dégustation. The result is a food and wine collaboration with Ryan’s Kitchen, situated at 1 Place Vendôme in the Main Road. Available Monday to Saturday at lunchtime (12h00 and 15h30), patrons have the option of a four- or seven-course taster menu, created exclusively by Chef Ryan Smith.

The wine and food collaboration is hosted in the Tasting Studio situated within Ryan’s Kitchen. Each wine and food combination has been masterfully selected and paired by owners of Black Elephant Vintners, Kevin Swart and Jacques Wentzel, together with Chef Ryan. The menu dégustation displays the chef’s ability to seamlessly create taste and flavour sensations.

The four course menu dégustation (R235) consists of:

  • Fox and Flamingo Rosé served with fish sashimi, radishes and a seaweed stock
  • Two Dogs, a Peacock and a Horse served with a green pea, gooseberry miso gel
  • Timothy White served with souse vide buttery baby potatoes and snoek and fresh chives
  • Nicholas Red served with parmesan cheese croquets and smoked eggplant

The seven course menu degustation (R330) consists of:

  • Black Elephant Vintners MCC served with an octopus apple ceviche
  • Fox and Flamingo Rosé served with fish sashimi, radishes and a seaweed stock
  • Two Dogs, a Peacock served and a Horse served with a green pea, gooseberry miso gel
  • Timothy White served with souse vide buttery baby potatoes and snoek and fresh chives
  • Nicholas Red served with parmesan cheese croquets and smoked eggplant
  • Amistad Pinotage served with pan fried line fish, mole and coriander
  • Amistad Syrah served with braised lamb rib, peanuts and spices

Black Elephant Vintners focuses on identifying and procuring estate-grown grapes cultivated within the Franschhoek Valley and its surrounding regions from which it produces and crafts quality wines. “We’ve chosen to take the pomp and ceremony out of winemaking; focusing on demystifying the process for all enthusiasts and injecting true enjoyment into every sip of wine,” says Swart. “Our wines represent our sincerest endeavours to bring the Franschhoek experience to all wine lovers around the globe for the sole purpose of enjoyment and as an expression of our appreciation for our good life.”

Their diverse brand portfolio enables BE Vintners to provide a range of wines with unique physical characteristics that appeal to different desires, tastes and occasions. They even offer wine and music pairings aptly named Wine Unplugged at their cellar.

For patrons who only want wine tasters, the Tasting Studio will be open Monday to Saturday from 11h00 to 16h30. Four wine tasters cost R75 and seven R125. (R235 and R330 if served with the menu degustation.) Bookings for the Black Elephant Vintners Tasting Studio are essential.

ryans@bevintners.co.za

2016 Eat Out Mercedes-Benz Restaurant Awards winners

Alisha Erasmus, Lee-Ann Fouche-Wessels, Nick Oosthuizen and Chris Erasmus of Foliage at the 2016 Eat Out Mercedes-Benz Restaurant Awards.

South Africa’s best culinary talents were honoured at the 2016 Eat Out Mercedes-Benz Restaurant Awards on Sunday, 20 November. Franschhoek restaurants didn’t win any of the big prizes, but were well represented with three claiming places among the top 10.  They are: The Tasting Room at Le Quartier Français (4th), The Kitchen at Maison (8th) and Foliage (9th).

For an unprecedented fifth consecutive year, The Test Kitchen was named Restaurant of the Year.

Gregory Czarnecki of The Restaurant at Waterkloof won the coveted title of Eat Out S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna Chef of the Year.

La Colombe was recognised for maintaining the highest level of service with the Eat Out Nespresso Service Excellence Award and the first-ever Eat Out John Psillos Award for Outstanding Contribution to Service, which was awarded to front-of-house manager Jennifer Hugé.

The much-admired chef, restauranteur and author Peter Veldsman was the winner of the Eat Out Lannice Snyman Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Eat Out Nederburg Rising Star Award went to Angelo Scirocco of Urbanologi in Johannesburg for his promising talent, and the Eat Out Wine Service Award for a top sommelier was won by Tinashe Nyamudoka of The Test Kitchen.

In another industry first, The Table at De Meye in Stellenbosch was the recipient of the inaugural Eat Out Woolworths Sustainability Award, which recognises a restaurant that is making strides towards sustainability by implementing environmentally and socially responsible practices and being cognisant of the importance of higher animal welfare.

Foxcroft, the new restaurant opened by chefs Scot Kirton and Glen Williams of La Colombe, was named the Eat Out Retail Capital New Restaurant of the Year. Marble in Rosebank, Johannesburg, received the Eat Out Boschendal Style Award for its show-stopping interior design and décor. The winner of the Woolworths TASTE Eat Out Bursary was Ayanda Matomela, who was selected for his passion and enthusiasm.

www.eatout.co.za

How now brown owl?

The rescued young Spotted Eagle Owl

On the evening of 1 December Dalena Roux was taking her usual walk around the Reservoir Street dam when her dog Jessie drew her attention to an owl, sitting on the ground behind the bench on the dam wall above the school tennis courts. It was not clear whether the bird was hurt although it seemed unable to fly and scrambled around in the scrub.

Concerned that dogs could attack and harm the owl, Dalena called the Tatler. We immediately called Ina Els who regularly walks at the dam in the evenings and is used to dealing with animals. She was on her way to the scene within minutes. We then called Nick Norman who lives next to the dam. The “Nick, there’s a crisis at the dam can you go there immediately?” call alarmed him, as he knew of the fire at the Berg River Dam where a number of people had fought a brave fight the previous night. When he realised the dam in question was the one next to his house and an owl was in trouble, he grabbed a towel and joined Dalena and Ina. The frightened Spotted Eagle Owl was not easy to catch but was outsmarted by the intrepid trio, assisted by Ben Astfalk who had come with his father Jeremy and joined the rescue party. It turned out to be a juvenile that was not injured but could not yet fly. Nick took it home in the towel and put it in a box supplied by Jeremy, where it was safe and dark.

Caro Iuel, a passionate and experienced animal carer, came to have a look and suggested that the owl be taken to Spier. That is exactly what happened and the young bird was put in a big aviary with other owlets and surrogate mothers who feed them. When the Franschhoek owl can fly and is ready to be released, Nick will fetch it and bring it home where it can live a natural life in ‘wild’ surroundings.

Nick has asked residents who come across an owl, or any other helpless, vulnerable bird around the dam, to call him immediately on his cell phone (083 287 5756) to see whether the bird can be successfully rescued.

Kudos to the Franschhoekers who went out of their way to rescue one of our beloved Spotted Eagle Owls and give it the best possible chance of a good life.

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