Home Lifestyle ‘Mosbolletjies’ a Must

‘Mosbolletjies’ a Must

1111

Harvest-time is Mosbolletjie time and this year, La Motte makes even more of this iconic treat. Expect all that you love about these seasonal brioche-type buns, but now, other than being made with must (fermenting grape juice), the innovative baking team in the La Motte Bakery also uses a sweet sourdough culture! The result is a richer taste, a more generous size and in general, just more Mosbolletjie!

Viticulture and the idea to use must as a raising agent, were introduced to the region when French Huguenot refugees settled in the Franschhoek Valley in the seventeenth century. Mosbolletjies were typically made during the wine making season when its key ingredient was readily available and enjoyed with black coffee for breakfast. Today, La Motte’s slow-fermented sourdough method combines old tradition with current health-focused science to unlock the full nutritional value of La Motte’s favourite bread.

Must is one of the wonderful products of the wine grape harvest that does not only have a rich history but is also a versatile seasonal ingredient in many recipes – even in the modern-day kitchen. It has been a popular ingredient in cooking since ancient times and it was probably the French Huguenots who brought the “recipe” to South Africa. Apart from being used in must jam and vino cotto, it can also be used as an ingredient in savoury and meat dishes.

Probably first used as an ingredient for bread and rusks in a wine producing country such as Germany or France, one of the earliest references to bread baked with must, is during the reign of King Edward I (1272-1307). In South Africa Mosbolletjies (similar to brioche) are often eaten fresh with butter or dried as rusks. Traditionally it was served fresh with black coffee early in the morning – similar to the French tradition of serving black coffee and croissants.